Phillip Island Nature Park (PINP) and the very popular little penguins achieved a significant milestone when they were put on the map as a must-see experience 100 years ago. Since then, the iconic Penguin Parade has become one of Australia's most popular tourist attractions.

The story of the penguin parade began in 1921 when His Excellency the Governor, the Earl of Stradbroke, viewed the little penguins − kicking off a hugely successful ecotourism industry on the island.

Over the past 100 years, tens of millions of people from more than 70 countries are estimated to have visited to watch the nightly parade of penguins – and that’s just in person. Another 25 million viewers watched Live Penguin TV from their homes during coronavirus pandemic restrictions.

Phillip Island forms part of the traditional lands of the Bunurong People, whose connection with the Summerland Peninsula and its Little Penguins extends for thousands of years.

Next time you are looking to reconnect with colleagues away from your desks, consider a corporate socially responsible team building activity at Phillip Island Nature Park.  Just 90 minutes from Melbourne, PINP embarks on a coastal wildlife life journey. Book a VIP tour to have a private ranger guide share conservation stories while participating in a hands-on making experience where your team builds much needed artificial burrows that act as a box for wildlife in the area. 

Then top off the day with the infamous Phillip Island's Penguin Parade by observing from an exclusive skybox, the nightly penguin count of Australia’s largest penguin colony in Australia, waddle back home at sunset before heading to the Underground viewing area for up-close views of the penguins

Penguin numbers on the island have almost tripled since the mid-1980s − from 12,000 to around 32,000 breeding birds today thanks to extensive conservation work.

Find out more about PINP and start planning your next escape from the desk today.